A pedestrian who was struck and trapped by a Metro SubwayLink train has been rescued and transported to an area hospital, a Baltimore City Fire Department spokesperson said.

The department responded to a 911 call at the Upton Station for a pedestrian hit, said Kevin Cartwright, the department’s spokesperson. The pedestrian was unconscious but was freed by a rescue team and attended to by paramedics, Cartwright said.

“It was reported that a leg or both legs were amputated,” Cartwright said. The person was transported to a local hospital in critical condition.

A spokesperson for the Maryland Transit Administration said a man fell onto the tracks at the station around noon Wednesday and was struck by a train. He has a non-life-threatening injury, and the incident remains under investigation, the spokesperson said in an email.

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Maryland Transit Police are seen outside the Upton Metro Subwaylink Station in Baltimore on Jan. 10, 2024.
Maryland Transit Police are seen outside the Upton Metro SubwayLink Station in Baltimore on Jan. 10, 2024. (Daniel Zawodny)

The Upton Station was temporarily closed because of a “medical emergency” Wednesday afternoon, but reopened around 1:20 p.m., according to the Maryland Transit Administration.

The identity of the pedestrian was not immediately released.

A second person was pulled from the tracks at the Upton Station around 3:30 p.m., according to an MTA employee who spoke to a reporter there.

Several Maryland Transit Police vehicles could be seen outside the station around 3:45 p.m. The person who was pulled from the track appeared intoxicated but uninjured.

The Maryland Transit Administration said in a statement that a man fell on the tracks at the Upton Metro SubwayLink Station at about 3:30 p.m. The man was pulled from the track and was transported to a local hospital with a non-life-threatening injury, MTA said. The incident is under investigation.

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The incidents come shortly after the MTA installed new barriers at all Metro SubwayLink stops as an added safety measure. The sets of yellow plastic bollards — positioned at the gaps where rail cars connect to one another — are meant to prevent riders, especially those with vision impairments, from mistaking the gap as an open train door.

Twelve yellow plastic bollards of varying heights stand in front of a moving train car inside a Baltimore subway station.
The Maryland Transit Administration began installing new plastic bollards at all Metro SubwayLink stations to help prevent riders with vision impairment from mistaking the gaps between train cars as an open train door. (Daniel Zawodny)

The bollards only cover short sections of each platform. Much like plastic bollards that are used throughout the city to section off bike lanes, the yellow subway bollards are bolted into the ground but flex in any direction underweight.

Daniel Zawodny covers transportation for The Baltimore Banner as a corps member with Report For America, a national service organization that places emerging journalists with local newsrooms that cover underreported issues.

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