Yg Teck live at Motorhouse

Park Heights native, Yg Teck, organized a special concert titled “Day Ones” for his Baltimorean fans to attend. The event was promoted for just a few days as a not-so-expected collaborative concert with the King Midas-headed The Natives band.

But the show’s atmosphere mirrored a more intimate take on “MTV Unplugged”; Teck’s closest friends, family and a few avid supporters enjoyed what essentially felt like an at-home listening party. Motor House, the West North Avenue venue where “Day Ones” took place, was dimly lit with pink and blue spotlights sprinkled throughout. Spaghetti, fried chicken and salmon sandwiches made by Krazi Katering left an enticing aroma in the space. Teck also gifted attendees with drink tickets and a trucker hat from his No Excusez apparel brand.

Yg Teck live at Motorhouse

Originally known as a “freestyler,” Yg Teck is now arguably the most consistent artist Baltimore has produced in recent memory, having released a project every year since 2017. He is beloved by the city due to his passion-filled, often-motivating lyrics. Teck’s music blends the line of being a rap superstar with the relatable everyday entrepreneur. Since taking off in music, Teck has also propelled himself into other avenues like owning his own trucking and clothing companies.

“To get where I’m at right now, I understand how important my supporters are to me,” Teck said after last night’s show. “Without them, there wouldn’t be no me. A little thousand or two thousand dollars on some food and drinks not gonna hurt me ‘cause these people made me hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

Divided into thirds, the first 20 minutes of Teck’s performance had backing from The Natives, which hosted lead singer and producer, King Midas, four background singers, a percussionist and a bassist. Dripped in bright diamond-encrusted jewelry, a gray Louis Vuitton T-shirt and white jeans, he performed some of his most resonant tracks. Hustlers’ anthems — like the title track of “90 Day Run,” and “Bussdown Days Coming 2″ from his “Eyes Won’t Close 2project — were recited word-for-word with audience members.

While the bulk of his performances up to this point were high energy, Teck planned something totally distinct for his closest admirers. “This not for everybody. I wanted the people who really appreciate my music and been following my journey to be here,” he said. “I usually don’t get to perform the songs that I’m really talking on and that’s what built my fan base. I wanted to do something for those people who helped me get hot.”

Yg Teck live at Motorhouse

After a brief intermission, he returned in a jewelry-free all-black outfit — a look that’s reminiscent of his pre-nationally established days — to perform his earlier singles. The crowd-favorite moment of the night — to no surprise — was the same song that made Yg Teck a household name throughout Baltimore and a name to consider to out-of-towners.

DTLR Freestyle,” is a radio interview performance that was originally featured on media personality Jay Hill’s DTLR Radio show in 2017. The four-and-a-half-minute-long freestyle displayed Teck’s cherished traits in his rhymes as every lyric hit with wholehearted conviction. Once fans caught wind of it in 2017, you couldn’t open a social media app without seeing someone reciting the lyrics. It now has close to 2 million views on YouTube. At Motor House, as soon as the song started, the crowd rapped with Teck in unison, going so far as to even overshadow his microphone’s volume at one point.

Teck, being a veteran showman, ensured everyone in attendance would have an unforgettable night by pacing through the crowd mid-performance to give daps out and bringing out surprise guests. The first was Baltimore legend, Young Moose. The duo performed their renowned “Forgiveness Freestyle,” trading bars as everyone in attendance surrounded the stage.

East Baltimore standout artist Young Moose

Later in the night, Teck was joined by YBS Skola and Roddy Rackzz for the recent WhiteboyCameWitDaBag-produced smash hit, “Bus Fare.” Speaking on the camaraderie he shares with these artists and unity in Baltimore, Teck explained, “They say that we don’t work together and I think that that’s false and if it’s not false, I’m changing the narrative right now. I don’t have a problem with no artist in the city. I feel like it’s important to bring people together and show everybody what Baltimore really look like.”

Reminiscent of the late L.A. rapper and entrepreneur Nipsey Hussle’s decision to sell his 2013 “Crenshaw mixtape for $100 per copy, Yg Teck managed to sell out “Day Ones” with tickets priced the same. Although betting on himself is nothing new to Teck, he’s noticeably proud of this night in particular. He boasts, “Sometimes it take some time, but you gotta stay down. I’m just showing everybody what the underdog look like. I’m the poster child of the hard times and I accept that.”