You could line up for tickets to see “A Christmas Carol,” catch the county executive in a Latin dance competition or listen to some award-winning blues. Those are just some of the best things to do through Nov. 22.

Dive into Civil Rights

5:30-9 p.m. Thursday

Maryland Hall will host three events in one night that will give you a chance to dive into the story of the 1960s Civil Rights movement in ways you may never have experienced.

It starts with an opening reception for the traveling exhibit, “I Am A Man: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1970.″ At 7 p.m., you can watch a rare double feature of “The Bus,” a 1965 film about the journey to the 1963 March on Washington, and “The March” about the impact of the Rev. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

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After the showings, filmmaker Bill Gaskins will talk about the myths and realities of American life through African Americans. The reception and exhibit are free, but registration is requested. $5 for the screening and lecture.

No cutting in line, Scrooge

9 a.m.-noon Saturday

Annapolis is willing to line up for certain things. One of them is the biennial production of “A Christmas Carol” by Colonial Players, the city’s longest-running amateur theater company.

People usually make a night of it by getting in line for tickets late Friday. A musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ 1843 novella, the play was written by Annapolis playwright Rick Wade and the late composer Dick Gessner more than 40 years ago. The show will run Dec. 7-17.

The players provide hot cider and entertainment. $10, cash or check. Tickets are delivered via email.

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Thanksgiving market

7 a.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday

If you’re cooking for Thanksgiving, and even if you’re not, the weekend before the big feast is a great time to visit the Anne Arundel County Farmers’ Market. Some vendors are still accepting preorders for turkeys, pies and other staples for the table. But browsing is half the fun. Free admission, vendor prices vary.

Is that a samba?

7 p.m. Saturday

Anne Arundel County Executive Steuart Pittman has said he wants to win “Movers & Shakers,” a dance competition raising funds for construction of an orphanage in Mexico by the Benjamin Mario Shadrick Foundation. He and six other competitors have been taking lessons in tango, merengue, bachata, salsa and cumbia, and will take to the main stage at Maryland Hall in front of a panel of judges.

Other dancers include Frank Campbell, managing partner of the Sims & Campbell law firm; Laura Gutierrez, board president of the Organization for Hispanic Latin Americans; Chanel Johnson, executive director of the Banneker-Douglass Museum; County Councilwoman Lisa Rodvien; Naptown Scoop publisher Ryan Sneddon; and Mary Spencer, president of the Community Foundation of Anne Arundel County.

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Tickets for the event are $75. Raffle tickets are also available for purchase, with the prize of an all-inclusive stay in Los Cabos, Mexico, with airfare, for two people. Tickets to a post-show reception with the contestants are $50.

One thought on the outcome — the hips don’t lie.

Anne Arundel County Executive Steuart Pittman dances in his office during a promotional video for "Movers & Shakers" a Latin dance competition charity fundraiser on Saturday.
Anne Arundel County Executive Steuart Pittman dances in his office during a promotional video for “Movers & Shakers,” a Latin dance competition charity fundraiser on Saturday. (Courtesy photo)

Beginning to look a lot like ...

5-10 p.m. Sunday through Jan. 1

If ticket sales for “A Christmas Carol” (see above) or that neighbor who hangs strings of twinkling lights the day after Halloween weren’t enough, the return of Lights on the Bay is a sure sign that the holiday season is underway.

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The drive-thru display at Sandy Point State Park raises funds for the SPCA of Anne Arundel County and includes a dedicated night for walkers with pets. Weather permitting, the lights are on seven days a week. $20 per car, $30 for large passenger vans, minibuses and trolleys; $50 for buses. $5 for 3D glasses.

Weekends draw the largest crowds, so consider a Monday-Thursday drive.

Monday night blues

7:30 p.m. Monday

Jon Shain, 2019 winner of the International Blues Challenge, will join his longtime collaborator FJ Ventre to perform some of their latest recorded works at 49 West Coffeehouse in Annapolis. $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door.

Turkey trotters, go

Noon Tuesday

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Buffalo, New York, is widely credited with hosting the first turkey trot — in 1896. Six runners busted down city streets long before anyone started talking about running as healthful or fun, according to Runners World. Two finished.

The annual Fleet Feet Turkey Trot begins Thanksgiving morning at the Eastport foot of the Spa Creek Bridge. Registration is online only by noon Tuesday.
The annual Fleet Feet Turkey Trot begins Thanksgiving morning at the Eastport foot of the Spa Creek Bridge. Registration is online only by noon Tuesday. (Courtesy photo)

There will be a lot more than that at the two biggest trots around Annapolis.

To run or walk a Thanksgiving event in Annapolis, you must register by noon Tuesday, Nov. 21 for the 17th Fleet Feet Sports Turkey Trot. The run begins at 9 a.m. for the fastest runners on the Eastport side of the Spa Creek Bridge. $45, with discounts for teens and young children. Proceeds benefit Girls on the Run Chesapeake.

The day before the feast, you can run or walk a 5K and 1-mile course at Anne Arundel Community College. The trot begins at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday. $10-$20, advance registration only. Proceeds will support the college’s kinesiology program scholarship fund and the campus fitness center.

rick.hutzell@thebaltimorebanner.com

Rick Hutzell is the Annapolis columnist for The Baltimore Banner. He writes about what's happening today, how we got here and where we're going next. The former editor of Capital Gazette, he led the newspaper to a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the 2018 mass shooting in its newsroom.

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