Many Baltimoreans have thoughts about the city’s water infrastructure systems, and many Baltimoreans enjoy watching dance. Most would probably not think to combine the two.

Fluid Movement, the aquatic-based performing arts group, did just that with a whimsical production of “Sinkholes, Sewers, & Streams: A Water Infrastructure Ballet.” The program helped the group close their 24th year with more than 100 swimmers, eight actors and the Dan Meyer Choir.

Held at Druid Hill Park and Riverside Park pools over the course of several weekends, the event brings hundreds of spectators every summer and this year was no different. Led by “Miss Drizzle,” the cast goes through Baltimore City’s systems to learn about how water works.

According to an interview with Baltimore magazine, the idea behind the group started in 1998 in a feminist reading club that covered the intersection of art and communities. Professional cabaret artist and group lead Beatrix Burneston, who uses the stage name Trixie Little, told the magazine, “We got to the point where we had read a bunch of books and I’m like, ‘Okay, we can sit here and read all day — but what are we going to do about it?’

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The answer? Fluid Movement’s water ballet. In addition to the water system, the group has tackled topics such as Baltimore’s role in the War of 1812, evolution and the impact of our trash that have been enjoyed by — and informative to — residents ever since.

Shiny swimmers perform deck choreography in “The Fatberg Scene.” (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
Anne Beck, 33, performs a platform lift in the "Sad and Lonely Tale of Mr. Bottle" scene..
Anne Beck, 33, performs a platform lift in the “Sad and Lonely Tale of Mr. Bottle” scene. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
“The Fatberg Scene” tableau. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
The “Rock Gala Formal” is quickly interrupted by water droplets bursting through, creating a sinkhole. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
Stefanie McKenzie, 44, and other swimmers perform in the finale scene.
Stefanie McKenzie, 44, and other swimmers perform in the finale scene. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
The Dan Meyer Choir performs original interlude music after every scene, teaching the audience about Baltimore’s infrastructure. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
Spiral Weber, 16, Amanda Qu, 25, and Drew Robison, 34, pose as toxic germs before performing to a Britney Spears song. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
Toxins, purified by chlorine, cheer after becoming clear drinking water. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
Performers in "The Fatberg Scene" do choreography around a prop created by pool noodles, spray foam insulation, chicken wire and glitter dot fabric. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)
Performers doing choreography in the "Sad and Lonely Tale of Mr. Bottle" scene..
Performers do choreography in the “Sad and Lonely Tale of Mr. Bottle” scene. (Cori Fordham/The Baltimore Banner)

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