Results for primary Election Day have begun to come in for U.S. Senate candidates and more.

Our reporters have been out all day talking to voters and candidates. These are the latest updates around the state.

Election results


Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott wins rematch against Sheila Dixon

Emily Sullivan |
Mayor Brandon Scott addresses crowd after win over Sheila Dixon in primary election.
Mayor Brandon Scott addresses crowd after win over Sheila Dixon in primary election.

Mayor Brandon Scott is on track for a second term, besting challenger Sheila Dixon in Baltimore’s Democratic mayoral primary.

Scott had a several thousand vote lead over Dixon as results came in Tuesday evening, with more than 70% of precincts reporting, plus results from early voting and a first round of mail-in ballots. The AP called the race for Scott around 11:30 p.m.

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Mark Parker declares victory in Baltimore’s 1st District City Council race

Clara Longo de Freitas |
Mark Parker is a candidate for the Baltimore City Council in the 1st District. (Handout)
Mark Parker is a candidate for the Baltimore City Council in the 1st District. (Handout)

Mark Parker declared victory in the race for Baltimore City Council’s 1st district seat late Tuesday as he held a solid lead with 54% of the votes in one of two closely watched council races without incumbents.

Parker faced two other Democratic challengers and declared victory after talking to his closest opponent, Liam Davis, who was tailing him with 35% of the votes. In a phone call with Parker, Davis said he would be there to work with the councilmember to better neighborhoods in the district, regardless of who holds the seat.

“I’ll be there,” Davis told Parker.

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Cohen poised for victory over Mosby, Sneed in race for Baltimore council president

Adam Willis and Liz Bowie |
Zeke Cohen is interviewed at his election night party at Darker Than Blue Grille on election night, May 14, 2024. (The Baltimore Banner)
Zeke Cohen is interviewed at his election night party at Darker Than Blue Grille on election night, May 14, 2024. (The Baltimore Banner)

Zeke Cohen held a commanding lead late Tuesday over his opponents in the race for Baltimore City Council president, incumbent Nick Mosby and Shannon Sneed.

“I will be proud and humbled to lead the council,” Cohen, currently a second-term 1st District councilman, said at his election party at Darker Than Blue Grille in Mount Vernon.

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Maryland state Sen. Sarah Elfreth wins 3rd District Democratic primary race

Brenda Wintrode and Abby Zimmardi |
Harry Dunn and Sarah Elfreth (The Baltimor Banner)
Harry Dunn and Sarah Elfreth (The Baltimor Banner)

Maryland state Sen. Sarah Elfreth won the Democratic primary race for Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District, according to the Associated Press.

The Maryland State Board of Elections website is showing Elfreth leading her opponents by several thousand votes with more than half of the precincts reporting.

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Scott, Dixon locked in tight race for Baltimore mayor

Emily Sullivan |
Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott and mayoral candidate Sheila Dixon. (The Baltimore Banner)
Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott and mayoral candidate Sheila Dixon. (The Baltimore Banner)

Baltimore’s Democratic mayoral primary was too close to call Tuesday night, with Mayor Brandon Scott and challenger Sheila Dixon trading the lead as election day votes were slowly tallied.

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Alsobrooks wins Senate Democratic primary; will face Hogan in the fall

Pamela Wood, Penelope Blackwell, Meredith Cohn and Rona Kobell |
Larry Hogan and Angela Alsobrooks
Larry Hogan and Angela Alsobrooks

Angela Alsobrooks won the Democratic primary for the state’s open U.S. Senate seat Tuesday night and will face off against Republican former Gov. Larry Hogan in the general election.

The race between Alsobrooks and rival David Trone had appeared close in the final days of the campaign. The Associated Press called the race for Alsobrooks at about 9:45 p.m., as she opened up a lead as votes were counted.

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Maryland state Sen. Sarah Elfreth out front in 3rd District primary race

Brenda Wintrode and Abby Zimmardi |
Harry Dunn and Sarah Elfreth are among the Democrats running in Maryland's 3rd Congressional District in 2024.
Harry Dunn and Sarah Elfreth are among the Democrats running in Maryland's 3rd Congressional District in 2024.

Maryland state Sen. Sarah Elfreth has taken an early lead in the Democratic primary race for Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District.

The Maryland State Board of Elections website is showing Elfreth leading her opponents by several thousand votes, based on counted mail-in and early votes. However, no precincts in Howard and Anne Arundel counties have reported primary Election Day results.

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Cohen jumps out to early lead over Mosby, Sneed in Baltimore council president race

Adam Willis |
Baltimore City Council President Nick Mosby, center, Shannon Sneed, left, and Zeke Cohen during a televised debate hosted by WBAL in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center on Wednesday, April 17, 2024 in Baltimore, MD. (Wesley Lapointe/ for the Baltimore Banner)
Baltimore City Council President Nick Mosby, center, Shannon Sneed, left, and Zeke Cohen during a televised debate hosted by WBAL in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center on Wednesday, April 17, 2024 in Baltimore, MD. (Wesley Lapointe/ for the Baltimore Banner)

Zeke Cohen jumped out to an early lead Tuesday in the Democratic primary for Baltimore City Council president, as initial returns showed the 1st District councilman a few thousand votes ahead of both incumbent Nick Mosby and Shannon Sneed.

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Scott's party turns celebratory as early results come in

Emily Sullivan |

At Mayor Brandon Scott's election night watch party, supporters burst into cheers as the 9:25 p.m. count update gave the incumbent at a narrow lead over Sheila Dixon.

Mr. Incredible, the DJ manning the music, had celebratory beats lined up. A remix of Fergie's "London Bridges" pulsed through the room as TV playing WJZ showed the updated results.

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Trone supporters waiting, watching for Senate results

Rona Kobell |
Trone supporter Thomas Maronick says the businessman has the best chance of beating Larry Hogan in a general election. (Oliver Mack for The Baltimore Banner)
Trone supporter Thomas Maronick says the businessman has the best chance of beating Larry Hogan in a general election. (Oliver Mack for The Baltimore Banner)

Around 50 Trone supporters had gathered by about 9 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, grazing on mini-sliders and sipping wine and beer. Thomas Maronick, a lawyer who practices in Glen Burnie, said he voted for David Trone primarily because Trone is a self-made businessman and has the best chance of beating Larry Hogan across a diverse state. He’s worried about the balance of the U.S. Senate and losing important rights as well as increasing tax breaks for wealthy people. Asked about the campaign’s ugliness in recent days and accusations that Trone tried to “buy the election,” Maronick said that’s as asset and not a liability. “You have all these PACS after Citizens United trying to influence elections,” he said. “David Trone is his own PAC. He’s not beholden to anyone.”

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City elections official: Turnout 'not real good'

Ramsey Archibald |

Armstead Jones, Baltimore's elections director, said Tuesday night that he was disappointed with voter turnout in the city. "There were no lines anywhere," he said. "It's not real good." He said as of 6 p.m., the city had only seen roughly 30,000 voters, and only one tray of just 40 to 50 mail-in ballots. "Normally we can get up to 10 or 12 trays per day," he said.

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Biden, Trump easily win Maryland primaries

Banner staff |
Baltimore-area voters pine for different choices in the presidential race. President Joe Biden, pictured in Dundalk days after the Key Bridge collapse. (Kylie Cooper/The Baltimore Banner)
Baltimore-area voters pine for different choices in the presidential race. President Joe Biden, pictured in Dundalk days after the Key Bridge collapse. (Kylie Cooper/The Baltimore Banner)

President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump easily won their party primaries in Maryland, with the Associated Press calling those races shortly after polls closed at 8 p.m. Biden, an 81-year-old Democrat, and Trump, a 77-year-old Republican have struggled to ignite enthusiasm among voters, polls have shown. Both routinely notch low favorability ratings. Trump is on trial this week in New York in a hush-money case from his 2016 campaign for president. Across the Baltimore region, voters expressed unease at their choices for president.

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Hogan wins GOP nomination; Democratic race too close to call

Pamela Wood, Penelope Blackwell, Meredith Cohn |

The Associated Press called the U.S. Senate Republican primary in Maryland for Larry Hogan not long after polls closed on Tuesday night. Hogan himself had yet to make a statement or appear onstage at his election night party in Annapolis when AP made the call at about 8:40 p.m. As results trickled in on Tuesday night, Alsobrooks and Trone were neck-and-neck, but too many ballots were left to be counted for the race to quickly be called in either candidate’s favor.

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Olszewski wins 2nd Congressional District, AP calls races for Mfume, Harris

Banner staff |

John Olszewski wins Democratic nomination for U.S. House in Maryland's 2nd Congressional District and incumbent Kweisi Mfume wins Democratic nomination for U.S. House in Maryland's 7th Congressional District. Incumbent Republican Andy Harris wins the nomination for U.S. House in Maryland's 1st Congressional District, with The Associated Press calling all three Congressional races at 8:43 p.m.

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Hogan wins Republican Senate nomination

Banner staff |

Former Gov. Larry Hogan easily won the Republican nomination for Maryland's open U.S. Senate seat, with the Associated Press calling the race just before 8:40 p.m.

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Surprise! That’s Brandon Scott outside the polling place

Emily Sullivan |
Mayor Brandon Scott takes a selfie with Sharon Baskin near Hatton Senior Center, in Baltimore, Tuesday, May 14, 2024. Scott was there to talk to voters before casting their ballots. (Jessica Gallagher/The Baltimore Banner)
Mayor Brandon Scott takes a selfie with Sharon Baskin near Hatton Senior Center, in Baltimore, Tuesday, May 14, 2024. Scott was there to talk to voters before casting their ballots. (Jessica Gallagher/The Baltimore Banner)

Mayor Brandon Scott visited a polling site at the Hatton Senior Center in Canton midafternoon, as heavy rain led voters to scurry in and out of the building. A few slowed down enough to realize the Democrat they voted to re-elect was standing nearby.

Lilly Walton, a 24-year-old Canton resident was one of them. She nabbed a selfie with the 40-year-old incumbent after she cast her first Baltimore city primary ballot. “I think he’s done a pretty good job so far,” she said. “And it’s nice to see a young person in office.”

She was open to other candidates and thought hard about whether they would bring a “breath of fresh air” into the mayor’s office.

“But his ideas still stand out to me,” she said.

Scott and campaign staff set up a canopy across the street from the senior center, and residents were quick to drop in and shake the mayor’s hand.

“I’m feeling good today, and we’re feeling good about the race,” the Democrat said. Asked if he thought he was in for a long night, and potentially a long few days, the mayor replied: “I’m very patient.”

In between voters’ visits to the canopy, Scott mingled with Mark Parker, a Highlandtown’s Breath of God Lutheran Church pastor who is seeking District 1’s up-for-grabs council seat, and Kaliope Parthemos, the chief of staff to former mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

Parker said that most election day voters arrived at the polls already knowing how they would cast their ballots, more so than early voters. But some were still uncertain, he said.

“I've seen people who genuinely weren't sure what they were gonna do in a few different races,” including Democratic picks for mayor and the U.S. Senate, he said. “But people are still coming to the polls with some ability to be persuaded left.”

The pastor said he felt good about both the race and the campaign he and his team have run. “The feeling good comes from having spent a year and a half working really hard,” he said. “You've mobilized a lot of your neighbors; you've done everything you can to put yourself in a strong position. You're not entering the outcome with any ‘what ifs’ or regrets.”

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Unhappy with the candidates, but exercising a right

Royale Bonds |

Brooklyn Park resident Gary Deleaver exercises his right to vote because of his predecessors and “what they had to go through to finally get to cast a voting ballot.”

The Democrat voted for Angela Alsobrooks because she would represent the people’s best interest.

“It’s about the people. Being a public servant isn’t about self,” Deleaver said.

The 58-year-old said there wasn’t much to choose from in terms of candidates. However, between the lesser of two evils, he’s going with President Joe Biden.

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Seeking a breath of fresh air

Hallie Miller |

Amir Mulgrave, 13, accompanied her grandmother Jeanette to the polls Tuesday afternoon, where the nurse practitioner proudly cast a vote for Brandon Scott in the mayoral race.

Mulgrave, though, said she would’ve voted for Dixon, whose ads have caught her attention. Her grandmother said Scott has more to do in office and that many of his initiatives are still “up and coming,” especially as it relates to neighborhood revitalization.

In the city council president race, Jeanette, who declined to give her last name so she could speak freely about her selections, said she “went against the mold” and supported Shannon Sneed, who she liked for her status as a City Hall outsider.

She also went with Bilal Ali in the 8th district council race, another breath of fresh air from business as usual, she said.

“He has a different perspective,” she said about Ali. “It’s time for a change.” Up the ticket, Jeanette went with U.S. Rep. David Trone, who she thinks is charismatic and most progressive out of all the options. She thinks he can work across the aisle and get things done.

She had hoped Trump would have been able to break from the party more than he did as president, but in the end, he disappointed her. That’s why she is voting to re-elect President Biden, she said, despite his flaws.

“His age is showing,” she said. “He’s trying to fight back but he doesn’t have the arsenal.” Trone, she added, could help make the country less fractured.

“This country is more divided than it ever should be,” she said. “I don’t have to agree with you on everything to work with you: he seems willing to do that.”

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A dance school connection leads to a vote

Emily Sullivan |

Blakely Deutsch, a city schoolteacher, braved midafternoon rain to visit a polling site at the Hatton Senior Center in South Baltimore’s Canton neighborhood. She was most eager to cast a ballot for Mark Parker, a pastor running for Councilman Zeke Cohen’s vacant seat.

“Mark is by far the best candidate,” she said. “He is already so active in this community and does so much to benefit the district.”

Parker is the pastor of Highlandtown’s Breath of God Lutheran Church. He first ran for the seat in 2016 and lost to Cohen.

Deutsch said that unlike other candidates who lose and are never seen by would-be constituents again, Parker continued to serve as a community advocate.

“He cares about our neighbors,” she said.

She was happy to vote to promote Cohen to City Council President. She doesn’t personally know him, but frequently sees him throughout Baltimore. Their daughters attend the same dance school.

“It's good to see that he is actually centered here,” she said, adding that she never considered voting for other candidates in his race.

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Crime a driving factor in voting

Royale Bonds |

Brooklyn Park couple Albert and Rhonda Scally came to Belle Grove Elementary School after a day of running errands to vote.

Rhonda Scally, 60, said she grew up voting because of her father’s belief that voting is vital.

“If I don't vote, I'm not I can't complain,” she said.

The pair, Republicans, did not feel comfortable sharing the candidates they voted for. However, they believe someone must do something about the crime and they wish they had better candidates to choose from.

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Endorsements and a last-minute decision

Hallie Miller |

Mayor Brandon Scott came out to Beechfield Elementary Tuesday afternoon, where he canvassed with 8th district candidate Paris Gray, who wore a “Duly Elected Incumbent” sweatshirt as he talked to voters.

Scott said he had endorsed in several City Council races — but not in District 1, where Zeke Cohen is stepping down as he runs for City Council President. He also declined to endorse in the 12th district, where Robert Stokes is fighting to keep his seat. He said either person would represent the district well.

In-home caregiver Ernestine Ross braved the rain to support former mayor Sheila Dixon, whom she “always” supports whenever she runs.

Ross, standing outside Beechfield Elementary Middle, said quality of life concerns had improved under Dixon’s last term, including the crime and homicide rates. She also voted for Nick Mosby, another person she “always” backs.

In the district’s council race, she voted for Paris Gray, thanks to the information provided on the campaign brochure he handed out on her way to the voting booth.

In the national races, Ross picked Alsobrooks and Biden, the latter of which she described as an easy choice.

“I don’t want Trump!” she said with a laugh.

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‘I’m sorry for what happened’: Republican voter apologizes for Jan. 6 Capitol riots

Brenda Wintrode |
Republican Richard Anthony of Cape St. Claire poses for a picture outside Broadneck High School on May 14, 2024, with Harry Dunn, a Democrat running to represent Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District. (Brenda Wintrode/The Baltimore Banner)
Republican Richard Anthony of Cape St. Claire outside Broadneck High School with Harry Dunn, a Democrat running to represent Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District. (Brenda Wintrode/The Baltimore Banner)

Republican Richard Anthony had already started driving away from his neighborhood voting center, when he pulled back into a parking spot and stepped back out into the rain. He had something more he wanted to say to Harry Dunn, a Democrat running to represent him in Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District and the former cop who helped defend the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. The men had just met moments ago.

“I’m sorry for what happened,” Anthony said to Dunn. “I thought Republicans liked cops.” Anthony said he’s “disgusted” with the GOP and that it’s not the party he joined back in the 80s. “What happened was so wrong, and it breaks my heart, you know, the whole condition of the country right now,” he said.

Although he voted for former Pres. Donald Trump in the last two elections, he wouldn't vote for him a third time, not after the attempted insurrection, he said.

“In fact, if he gets the nomination, I'm leaving the Republican Party,” the 62-year-old Cape St. Claire resident said.

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First-time Republican voter in Baltimore: ‘I'm just fed up’

Giacomo Bologna |
Patricia Smith at the Woodhome Recreation Center in Northeast Baltimore. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)
Patricia Smith at the Woodhome Recreation Center in Northeast Baltimore. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)

For the first time in her life, Patricia Smith, 62, asked for a Republican ballot when she went to vote at the Woodhome Recreation Center in Northeast Baltimore.

"I'm just fed up with what's happening," Smith said. "Letting these teenagers rule our city -- it's just gotta stop."

Since her husband's death, Smith said she's been watching the news more than ever, and she's deeply troubled by what she sees. Crime and inflation are out of control, Smith said.

Those issues, plus her opposition to abortion and same-sex marriage, led her away from Democratic party and to the Republicans, Smith said.

"I based it on what the Word of God says," Smith said.

Smith said she voted for Donald Trump in the presidential primary, but she was disappointed to learn she couldn't cast a vote in the Democratic primaries for city elections. Smith said she probably would have supported Sheila Dixon for mayor and Zeke Cohen for city council president.

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Couple splitting ballots in Timonium

Julie Scharper |
June and Warren Mitchell at Timonium Elementary School. (Julie Scharper/The Baltimore Banner)
June and Warren Mitchell at Timonium Elementary School. (Julie Scharper/The Baltimore Banner)

June Mitchell and Warren Mitchell arrived at Timonium Elementary School to vote for different candidates “just as they have been doing for their 54 years of marriage.

June Mitchell, 75, is a Democrat and Warren Mitchell, 79, is a Republican. The couple said they never discuss politics with each other.

“We learned that the hard way the first time Trump ran,” said June Mitchell, a retired economic development researcher.

June Mitchell said she voted for Trone in the Senate primary because she felt he was best poised to defeat Hogan.

“I love Hogan, but there are issues I can’t support him on,” most notably abortion rights, she said.

In contrast, her husband, a retired NASA contractor, was an emphatic supporter of Hogan. He believes a Republican-led Senate would be more fiscally conservative.

“We just can’t keep having $7 billion deficits,” he said.

Mohamed Farah, 57, and his son, Hassan Farah, 19, cast their ballots for Angela Alsobrooks at Timonium Elementary School Tuesday afternoon.

“That’s why we’re here,” said the elder Farah, a Johns Hopkins University neurology professor.

Hassan Farah, a Hopkins freshman who was voting for the first time, said friends had encouraged him to vote for Alsobrooks.

“She’s more progressive,” he said.

Mohamed Farah said he wanted to Maryland to send a woman to the Senate in light of many states curtailing abortion access. He thought Alsobrooks could easily fend off Hogan.

“She should win in a Democratic state,” he said.

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‘I will vote for a sense of change’

Ben Conarck |

Thomas Ham, who grew up near his polling place in Sandtown-Winchester, said he largely voted against incumbents.

"Sometimes, I confess, I will vote for a sense of change," Ham said.

That's part of the reason why Ham decided to throw his support behind Councilman Zeke Cohen in the race for City Council president, which he described as a "process of elimination."

As for the mayoral race, Ham said he was similarly looking for a fresh face. He said he was "not a fan of Brandon Scott," adding that, "to be fair about it, I don't know how much he could have gotten done."

"Politicians always run on, 'Let me stay in another term, I can get this fixed,'" Ham said. "Well, how long is that going to take?"

Ham said his biggest issue, "like most Baltimoreans," was concern over crime. Though he was aware that homicides had dropped year over year by roughly 20%, Ham said, "That's nothing to run on, as far as I'm concerned."

The lifelong Baltimorean ended up voting for a mayoral candidate he knew quite well: Bob Wallace. He said he knew him well and that he came from a "real solid family."

"I have a little more intimacy with him, so I went that route," Ham said. "And I'm not sorry for it. I know he doesn't have a big chance of winning, but sometimes you vote your values. You vote the right way, rather than the popular way."

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Some Baltimore polling places had delayed start

Giacomo Bologna, Cody Boteler, Lillian Reed |

Chief Election Judge Marion Highe, 77, said she’s been volunteering at her precinct site for a few decades. Voting at Walter P. Carter Elementary School in Wilson Park was slightly delayed this morning, she said.

Highe said that election volunteers weren’t able to get inside until 6:40 a.m. and the voting machines were not where they are normally located. Highe said volunteers also needed to find “memory sticks” for the machines and that voting started at 7:15 a.m.

In an email, Abigail Goldman, Baltimore’s deputy election director, said memory sticks were in all the machines and that the building was locked in the morning, but public schools employees were able to open the building.

This polling site in the 4th District is historically a busy one, Highe said, and almost 300 people had voted here as of 2 p.m.

“Everything turned out fine,” she said.

All three City Council president candidates stopped by to campaign outside, Highe said. Council President Nick Mosby stopped by early in the morning and “called downtown” to see if he could help fix the delay.

“He immediately jumped in to help,” Highe said.

She emphasized that none of the candidates for City Council president did any campaigning inside the election site.

Goldman said she had not heard of any of the candidates visiting the location, but said they should not go inside if they’re “visiting.”

Goldman also confirmed there was a delay this morning at the Graceland Park polling station due to “technical issues and challenges.” Voting started there a little after 9 a.m.

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Few voters showed up early at three polling places in Anne Arundel County

Brenda Wintrode |

Polling places at an Anne Arundel County library and two public schools saw few voters in the early morning hours.

Arnold resident and retiree John Cummings stopped by Margothy RIver Middle School to vote in person. He said he was disappointed that as a Democrat he had to wait until November to vote for former Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan for U.S. Senate. “He’s just been a terrific governor,” the 82-year-old said.

But as a Republican Cape St. Claire resident James Walsh did have that chance and said he voted Hogan.

“He’s been an advocate for Maryland in every way, shape and form, for his whole political life,” Walsh said.

The retired salesman said he skipped the House race for the 3rd Congressional District, saying he didn’t recognize any of the names or what they stood for, but he also skipped one the did know — former Pres. Donald Trump.

“He doesn’t need my help in the primary,” the 67-year-old said. But he plans to vote for Trump in the general.

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Backing incumbents, Baltimore voter wants elected leaders to work together

Giacomo Bologna |
Yolanda Curtis outside the polling location at Northwood Elementary School in Baltimore. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)
Yolanda Curtis outside the polling location at Northwood Elementary School in Baltimore. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)

Yolanda Curtis, 42, walked to the polling location at Northwood Elementary School from her home in Northeast Baltimore.

Curtis said she voted for City Council President Nick Mosby and Mayor Brandon Scott as well as for David Trone in the Senate primary. Politicians are always fighting against each other, she said, so she wanted leaders that can work together.

For the 3rd District, Curtis said she supported Margo Bruner-Settles over incumbent Ryan Dorsey -- mainly because of bike lanes.

Curtis said she thinks the bike lanes in her district are an eyesore, cause accidents, and often wind up getting knocked over and littering the street.

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Baltimore City Council candidates still campaigning for votes

Giacomo Bologna |
Baltimore City Councilmember Ryan Dorsey outside of Northwood Elementary School. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)
Baltimore City Councilmember Ryan Dorsey outside of Northwood Elementary School. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)

More than 200 people had voted at Northwood Elementary School as of lunchtime. Both city council candidates for the 3rd District, incumbent Ryan Dorsey and challenger Margo Bruner-Settles, were campaigning outside.

Bruner-Settles said the animating issue in the district is bike lanes. She said she's not opposed to them, but didn't like how they were implemented. There should have been more discussion, outreach and planning, she said.

"The hot topic in the area is the bike lanes," Bruner-Settles said. Dorsey said voters here care about a lot more than bike lanes. Baltimore voters are not single-issue voters, he said, and people came out to vote today because of the important slate of candidates.

"No, people are not coming out here because of the bike lanes," Dorsey said, in between bites of a fried chicken sandwich from Ekiben.

Dorsey said he was confident he would win every precinct in the district.

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‘I like people who are ‘people-ing,’’

Giacomo Bologna |
Letta Grant, right, and Ibrahim Pride outside Northwood Elementary School on Tuesday, May 14, 2024. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)
Letta Grant, right, and Ibrahim Pride outside Northwood Elementary School on Tuesday, May 14, 2024. (Giacomo Bologna/The Baltimore Banner)

Letta Grant, 48, and Ibrahim Pride, 25, live just down the road from Northwood Elementary School, where they cast ballots Tuesday.

Grant said the most important issue to her this election season is abortion rights, but at a local level she wanted to make sure she cast a vote for incumbent City Councilman Ryan Dorsey.

"He really comes and does stuff. I've seen him in person like five times," Grant said. "He's always working."

Grant said she also voted for Zeke Cohen in the race for city council president. She said Cohen seems personable and relatable.

"I like people who are 'people-ing,'" Grant said.

Pride said he voted similarly. As a younger voter, Pride said he felt it was especially important for him to cast a vote and have his voice heard.

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Nick Mosby touts his experience

Kristen Griffith |
Baltimore City Council President Nick Mosby and Vice President Sharon Green Middleton at Liberty Elementary School. (Kristen Griffith/The Baltimore Banner)
Baltimore City Council President Nick Mosby and Vice President Sharon Green Middleton at Liberty Elementary School. (Kristen Griffith/The Baltimore Banner)

Baltimore City Council president Nick Mosby made an appearance at Liberty Elementary Tuesday morning, one of 12 stops at polls to speak with voters. His opponents are nice people, he said "but when you look at their collective successes, resumes, policies that they've pushed, it pales in comparison to mine."

He touted his experience as both a council member and delegate, including keeping the Preakness Stakes in Baltimore.

"The things that I've been able to do and accomplish really shows who I am, what I fight for," Mosby said.

Vice President Sharon Green Middelton appeared alongside Mosby, said his experience, as well as his state and federal connections, are reasons why he should get another term.

"I've always set aside a person's personal life and that's what you have to do in this business," she said.

She said her experience is also a reason why voters should re-elect her. She's the longest serving elected official in city hall, she said, who has seen five different mayors.

"In this city, you definitely have to do at least two terms to really make a difference and help people," she said. In the years she's been on the council, she said she has worked to revamp Park Heights and the Forest Park library is getting a multi-million renovation.

"And I can't think of any council person that has ever had two libraries," said Green Middelton.

She said it happened because of the relationships she's built over the years and consistently listening to her constituents.

She thinks Brandon Scott deserves a second term.

"No mayor has been perfect as we have seen for a long time," she said.

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Baltimore voter focused on community

Kristen Griffith |
Wayno Amonra, who showed up to vote at Liberty Elementary School in Baltimore, said he's supporting Mayor Brandon Scott. (Kristen Griffith/The Baltimore Banner)
Wayno Amonra, who showed up to vote at Liberty Elementary School in Baltimore, said he's supporting Mayor Brandon Scott. (Kristen Griffith/The Baltimore Banner)

Wayno Amonra passed out pamphlets near Liberty Elementary School in Forest Park that read "Re-elect Sharon Green Middleton,” the Baltimore City Council's vice president representing District 6.

Amonra credited Middleton for rebuilding playgrounds, bringing city money to local recreation centers and revamping Park Heights.

"She didn't have to pay me to be out here," he said. "It's about the work being done in our community."

Amonra is a Republican but said he’s pulling for Democratic candidates this election, including Mayor Brandon Scott. Amonra wasn't a fan of Scott at first, but the mayor’s actions caught his attention, like making sure money from the city goes straight to the community, he said.

"And it's senseless to me to put someone back in office when we know they've been corrupt in the past," Amonra said about former Mayor Sheila Dixon.

In the Senate race, he favors Rep. David Trone. He sees him as a more accessible politician and likes that Trone advocates for people struggling with addiction.

"We see the drug issues going on in Baltimore City," Amonra said. "If he can see himself in these people, his family in these people, then he'll be willing to put in the work."

The Forest Park resident said he's undecided in the presidential race. Amonra was critical of President Joe Biden's response to conflict in the Middle East, but said he can't support former President Donald Trump after the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

"I don't know how people can just ignore those things," he said. "So I don't even know if I'll be casting a vote for president.”

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U.S. Senate race weighs on minds of some Annapolis voters

Rick Hutzell |

Voting in Annapolis was quiet at many polling places Tuesday morning, with voter turnout still in the double digits except at Annapolis High School.

There, a dozen campaign volunteers, including one candidate’s son, were handing out leaflets just beyond the warning signs, “No electioneering beyond this point.”

By 11 a.m., more than 150 voters had walked between them in ones and twos to the doors to the polling place, set up in the school cafeteria.

Kelsey Wetherington voted for Angela Alsobrooks in the Democratic primary, but said it was more of a vote against David Trone.

“There’s something about Trone,” she said.

Wetherington is already looking ahead to November, when she expects to cross party lines and vote for the likely Republican primary winner, former Gov. Larry Hogan. “Hogan will end up getting my vote in November,” she said. “I like what he stands for and that he doesn’t play politics.”

November was also on the mind of retired attorney John Davidson, a Republican who said he voted reluctantly for both former President Donald Trump and Hogan.

“I’m a little bit angry about Hogan because I wasn’t too pleased with some of the steps he took during COVID, shutting down the schools,” Davidson said. “It was very bad judgment.”

Two miles away at Mills-Parole Elementary School, Mhijaie Johnson said she voted for David Trone, mostly because he’s on the Appropriations Committee in the House and has been involved in funding schools. He also got an endorsement from the Maryland teachers union.

“I like him because of his support for the Key Bridge replacement funding, and because he supports schools,” she said. “Because my son is Autistic.”

That teacher’s union also won the support of Sean O’Neill, husband of Annapolis Alderwoman Karma O’Neill. He was voting at Germantown East Elementary School.

“My parents were teachers and I relied on that,” he said.

That didn’t convince Jenna Bryne, who voted for Alsobrooks at Germantown.

“Honestly, I like that she’s female and she’s also a person of color. Those things matter to me from a standpoint of representation.”

Democrats at all three polling places who spoke to The Banner said they voted for state Sen. Sarah Elfreth in the competitive 3rd District race for Congress.

In Elfreth’s home district, many voters said they knew her personally and agreed with her on her priorities and willingness to work with Republicans in the General Assembly.

“She’s a strong supporter of the Chesapeake Bay,” Bryne said.

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Our coverage of the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate

Banner Staff |

Either Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks or U.S. Rep. David Trone will likely face former Republican Gov. Larry Hogan in November, a race that could help decide control of the U.S. Senate. Read our profiles of the two Democratic candidates.

A Democrat in her second term leading Maryland’s second-largest county, Angela Alsobrooks — the first woman and Black woman elected to the position — said her life’s work has culminated in this: a bid for the state’s open U.S. Senate seat. If she wins, she would be the third Black woman ever elected to the chamber.

Rep. David Trone knows what critics are saying about him, and he still believes he is the best candidate. And he wants it, maybe more than he’s ever wanted anything, so he can keep doing the job he’s been doing, albeit on a larger stage where he can be more effective and where senators have to take meetings with him because he’s one of them.

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Our coverage of the Baltimore Mayor’s race

Banner Staff |

The rematch between incumbent Mayor Brandon Scott and former Mayor Sheila Dixon is here. Read the Banner’s profiles on the two candidates.

The voters who cast ballots for mayor Brandon Scott will weigh his tenure as an incumbent instead of his promises as a candidate.

For the third time since leaving City Hall amid a corruption scandal, Sheila Dixon is running to become mayor once again. Mayor Brandon Scott narrowly bested her in the 2020 Democratic primary, earning a few thousand more ballots than Dixon. This time, voters can compare the duo’s mayoral records.

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Slow and steady in Columbia

Jess Nocera |

As clouds blanketed the sky this morning, a handful of voters made their way into Wilde Lake High School in Columbia to cast ballots.

Inside, one of the head election judges said the number of voters had been light so far for the day. Having been a judge for over 20 years, he said, come November it will be a different ball game in terms of voter turnout.

As one voter walked in, they joked: “How am I supposed to wait in this line?” There was no line.

Over at Swansfield Elementary School in Columbia, a steady stream of people had voted by 11 a.m.

“So far we’ve had over 100 voters,” said Janis Horn, the chief election judge. “Everything has been running smoothly.”

Columbia resident Cher Harris said she was spurred by "anything related to Donald Trump" to come out and vote today.

“I want to make sure I come out strong for the Democrats,” Harris said.

As for the local Howard County school board race, Harris backed incumbent Jen Mallo. Her children attended Howard County Public Schools the same time as Mallo’s kids, she said.

“I’ve known her for a long time,” Harris said.

Kelli Shimabukuro, also a Columbia resident, came out to vote for her friend Terri Hill in the 3rd Congressional District race. She also supported Angela Alsobrooks in the Senate race.

“I believe in representation. We don’t have enough Black women in the Senate,” Shimabukuro, a former county librarian, said outside of Swansfield Elementary.

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Our coverage of the Baltimore City Council President’s race

Banner Staff |

The Democratic race to become Baltimore City Council president is in the hands of the voters. Read the Banner’s profiles on the three candidates: Nick Mosby, Zeke Cohen, and Shannon Sneed.

Today, Nick Mosby faces a crossroads. He’s running for reelection to his council president seat, and victory in May 14th’s Democratic primary could offer four years to reset and stabilize his political career. Losing would close, at least for now, a decade-long chapter in which the Mosbys have commanded the political spotlight in Baltimore.

Over eight years on the City Council, Zeke Cohen has not masked his ambitions for higher office, even publicly flirting with a run for mayor this year. Some of Cohen’s critics take a more cynical view of his intense campaign operation.

Shannon Sneed is the only woman in the race for City Council president, and she’s also the only candidate who has rejected support from corporations, labor unions and political action committees. Ashley Esposito, one of two elected members of Baltimore’s Board of School Commissioners, said some of her like-minded friends support Cohen and have wondered why Sneed decided to jump in and “ruin the race” — apparently tightening margins with the more moderate Mosby. “I’m like, ‘ruin the race?’” Esposito has told them. “Shannon is the true progressive candidate.”

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Alsobrooks and Trone head to the polls

Cody Boteler |

Rep. David Trone, who’s running in the Democratic primary for Senate, voted this morning with his wife June, according to a post Trone made on X.

Trone represents the western part of Maryland, Frederick County and part of Montgomery County. His biggest opponent in the race is Angela Alsobrooks, the Prince George’s County executive.

Alsobrooks, meanwhile, said this morning she had already voted — but that she went to the polls with her neighbor, Pat Adams.

“Ms. Pat has known me my entire life and it means the world to me she come out to vote for me in every election I’ve run,” Alsobrooks wrote on X. The county executive said Adams used to watch her play in the neighborhood park.

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Light turnout so far in Perry Hall

Lee O. Sanderlin |

At Perry Hall High School in Baltimore County everything is running smoothly this morning. There are two precincts here and both opened on time. There’ve been no issues other than low turnout. Voters have been “trickling,” precinct judge E.J. McNulty said.

One of the tricklers was 48-year-old Tracey Scarlett. The Democrat said she cast her ballot for Angela Alsobrooks today because, as a fellow Black mother, she can relate to her.

“She’s been consistent, I like her views,” Scarlett said.

Alsobrooks, in Scarlett’s mind, represents a politician who can “walk the walk,” and not just “talk the talk.” She’s hopeful she’ll get to cast another ballot for the Prince George’s County Democrat in November, and send a Black woman from Maryland to Washington while also keeping the Senate out of Republican hands.

Asked about President Joe Biden’s repeated emphasis that “democracy is on the ballot” this year, Scarlett said that was true, but that her biggest concerns are the economy and a perceived divisiveness gripping the country. She said she wants politicians who will make the world a better place for her kid and everyone else.

“I want us to be more of a world where we can just get along,” she said.

Maurice Coleman, 86, said he voted for Alsobrooks because he “likes the name.”

“Interesting name,” Coleman said.

Wearing an Orioles cap and coming out of the Perry Hall High School cafeteria, Coleman said the economy is this year’s biggest issue.

“It needs to be better,” he said.

He said he also likes former Gov. Larry Hogan, but that a Republican would not get his vote in November — he’s a Democrat and will vote like it.

“I just like the Democratic party,” he said.

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What Baltimore voters are saying about Scott and Dixon

Kristen Griffith, John-John Williams IV |

Happy Foster, 57, of Forest Park struggled with his pick for Baltimore mayor. He's thinking of moving out of the city and wants to leave it in good hands.

"I went with Sheila because I look at it like redemption," he said outside of Liberty Elementary School. "She went through a lot and is still standing. She's a true testament to losing everything and fighting to get it back."

The Democrat trusts her to oversee the Inner Harbor development where, he thinks, putting up new apartments will "shut people out. At least people who look like me."

Katia Crosby, also of Forest Park, said she picked Brandon Scott for mayor since he hasn't done anything "illegal" or "egregious." "I couldn't vote for Sheila Dixon," the 49-year-old Democrat said. "I think if anything, the past four years will give him [Scott] opportunity for growth.”

Crosby did have some advice for Scott: improve his relationship with Baltimore State's Attorney Ivan Bates.

Near the Steadman Station Firehouse downtown, several Sheila Dixon supporters were positioned a block away hoping to convince day-of voters to support the former mayor.

Brandin Bowden, 37, said he was informed to vote by past experiences in the city and name recognition. He supported Brandon Scott for mayor.

“I recognize he has a tough job,” he said.

With their swaddled newborn son in tow, Clarissa Taylor-Jackson and her husband Steven Jackson, said family and the future of the city were top of mind when entering the polling booth.

"We have a lot of presumed candidates who need to be reminded that support is not guaranteed," said Taylor-Jackson, a downtown resident who has lived in Baltimore since 2008. Taylor-Jackson said voting for Sheila Dixon was important because she has seen the difference in the city when Dixon ran it.

"I feel like there was less crime and more opportunity," she said. "I feel we were in a better place."

Taylor-Jackson said maternal health, education and youth topped her concerns – adding that if these were addressed maybe the city wouldn't experience the crime it has.

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Sheila Dixon is ‘at peace’

Zuri Berry |

Former Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon, arriving at her polling site this morning, said she's "at peace" as voting gets underway.

"There's no need in being stressed. There's no need in being hyper. There's no need in being any other way than being calm and at peace," Dixon told WJZ.

Dixon is running against incumbent Mayor Brandon Scott for the second time.

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What Baltimore voters are saying about their City Council choices

Brenna Smith |

Before Nicole Utech headed to work at Johns Hopkins, she stopped to vote at Hampstead Hill Academy. She said she likes to vote in person.

She's especially excited to vote this year for District 1 City Council Candidate Mark Parker, who is also a pastor. Utech said her family goes to his church and their kids go to school together.

"I see firsthand what he's doing in the community, and I want more of that," she said.

Couple Jenny Chan and Zach Greene vote together every year. But this year has been more challenging than others.

Other than Zeke Cohen, who is running for City Council president, Chan and Greene have gone back and forth over who else to support.

"We're actually pretty conflicted for many of the races," Chan said. "I just feel like there's not really anybody that I can point to and say, "Oh, yeah, they're my guy."

To Greene, voting is doubly important in a city like Baltimore.

"Local politics in Baltimore really stands out as a place of importance," Greene said. "The geography of Baltimore City is so small and the impact of Baltimore city elections is so large."

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Baltimore voter says candidates deserve another chance

Kristen Griffith |

Alfreda Murphy of Forest Park said she felt like it was her duty to vote. For the mayoral race, the Democrat went with former Mayor Sheila Dixon, saying combating crime was a “very important” issue.

There were two candidates that Murphy said deserved another chance: Baltimore City Council President Nick Mosby and President Joe Biden.

"I think we need to give him another chance in office to get acclimated," she said about Mosby outside of Liberty Elementary School. "He's doing a pretty good job."

Biden's experience is what was deserving of Murphy's vote. "Even though he's getting a lot of flack ... he's been in government forever," she said. He also needs time, said Murphy, to bring his plans to fruition.

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Hogan votes in Anne Arundel

Pamela Wood |
Former Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and his wife, Yumi, with supporters. (Pam Wood/The Baltimore Banner)
Former Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and his wife, Yumi, with supporters. (Pamela Wood/The Baltimore Banner)

Former Gov. Larry Hogan and his wife, Yumi, pulled up to Davidsonville Elementary School in a black campaign bus to cast their votes. A handful of supporters that had gathered in the parking lot greeted the couple and their grandchildren with cheers of "Hogan! Hogan! Hogan!"

After voting, Hogan expressed confidence that he'd win the Republican primary for U.S. Senate, though he noted that he didn't take anything for granted. He's not sure who Democrats will put forward for the Senate, either Prince George's County Executive Angela Alsobrooks or U.S. Rep. David Trone.

"We're hoping that we'll get the Republican nomination tonight and then the real campaign will begin," Hogan told reporters.

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Senate race top of mind

Lee O. Sanderlin, Jess Nocera |
A voting sign at the Roger Carter Community Center in Ellicott City (Jess Nocera/The Baltimore Banner)
A voting sign at the Roger Carter Community Center in Ellicott City (Jess Nocera/The Baltimore Banner)

Mary Walters, 77, is a Democrat and said she cast a ballot today for David Trone in the Senate primary. She hadn’t followed the race too closely, but was persuaded by Trone’s onslaught of TV advertisements.

“They’re just so compelling,” said Walters, who voted at the Dundalk Elementary School.

But that doesn’t mean the Dundalk resident would vote for Trone in the general should he win the primary — Walters said former Republican Gov. Larry Hogan is her man.

“I loved him as governor,” she said.

To her, a Trone-Hogan matchup is ideal because she’d be fine with whoever won.

“I told my daughter if Trone wins I wouldn’t be sad about it.”

Shannon Wollman got out to vote at the Roger Carter Community Center in Ellicott City before heading to work.

“I feel like it’s my responsibility as a citizen to be invested in the people who are going to represent my political beliefs,” said Wollman, a Democrat.

Wollman is paying close attention to the presidential and congressional races on the ballot.

“I’m torn when it comes to the Senate because I’m a Democrat, but I’m a fan of [Larry] Hogan and also a fan of [David] Trone,” she said.

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Early morning voters trickle in around the region

Brenna Smith, Jess Nocera |
The Kronsberg family made their way to vote on Tuesday in Canton. (Brenna Smith/The Baltimore Banner)
The Kronsberg family made their way to vote on Tuesday in Canton. (Brenna Smith/The Baltimore Banner)

There’s been a slow trickle of early morning voters at Hampstead Hill Academy in Canton. Outside the building, there are posters for Mayor Brandon Scott, Councilman Zeke Cohen and Joe Koehler, a CPA and the treasurer of the Canton Community Association.

The Kronsberg family made their way to vote with their daughter, who said she is “four and three-quarters.” Parents Sarah and Hal said they’ve been bringing her to vote ever since she was a baby.

“She’s excited,” her mom said. “Mostly for the stickers.”

Over in Howard County, it’s been pretty quiet at Roger Carter Community Center during the first hour of voting. While campaign posters lined the driveway entrance to the Ellicott City community space, only a handful of voters made their way into the polls. Most were walking in to complete their morning workout or take a swim.

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Polls are open | Find your polling place

You must vote at your assigned polling place on primary election day. You can find your assigned polling place using the voter lookup tool online.

Look up your polling place

What to know before you head to the polls

(Alex Fine for The Baltimore Banner)
(Alex Fine for The Baltimore Banner)

Maryland voters will go to the polls this year with an open race for a U.S. Senate seat that could help determine control of the body. In addition, voters will choose all eight of the state’s U.S. representatives — three of which are open seats. Baltimore voters will decide on competitive races for mayor, City Council president and City Council members for Baltimore’s 14 districts. Voters in Anne Arundel and Howard counties have school board primaries in select districts.

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