After a quiet, uneventful summer break in Baltimore, training camp is almost here. Ravens rookies report to the team facility on Tuesday, veterans arrive a week later, and the first open practice will he held in Owings Mills on July 26.

That leaves the Ravens just over a month to figure out what their 2023 team looks like. The 90-man offseason roster will be trimmed to 53 on Aug. 29, and practice squads will be formed a day later.

With few exceptions, the Ravens’ depth chart isn’t too hard to project. There are sure-thing starters and experienced backups at nearly every position. Before injuries, breakthroughs and new signings shake things up this camp, here’s a position-by-position look at the Ravens who are roster locks, near locks, on the bubble, and long shots.

Quarterback

Lock: Lamar Jackson

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Near lock: Tyler Huntley

On the bubble: Josh Johnson

Long shot: Anthony Brown

If the Ravens want to keep three quarterbacks on their roster so that they can dress all three on game day, just in case, it’d be hard to imagine Huntley not making the team. If the Ravens prefer to keep just two quarterbacks, as they have in recent years, he’d still be the heavy favorite to back up Jackson. Johnson is 37 and doesn’t have Huntley’s mobility, and Brown doesn’t have Huntley’s accuracy.

Running back

Lock: Gus Edwards, Justice Hill

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Near lock: J.K. Dobbins

On the bubble: None

Long shot: Keaton Mitchell, Owen Wright

Injuries are, of course, a concern, and Dobbins’ standoff with team officials at minicamp was a red flag. But the Ravens’ top three backs are pretty well established. Dobbins and Edwards have game-breaking potential. Hill is a more-than-capable backup with special teams value. If Mitchell or Wright makes the team, it’s likely because they’re in position to contribute immediately on special teams, too — and perhaps on offense in the not-too-distant future. Only Hill is under contract beyond this season.

Wide receiver

Devin Duvernay #13 of the Baltimore Ravens scores a touchdown during the second quarter of the game at MetLife Stadium on September 11, 2022 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
Devin Duvernay, No. 13 of the Baltimore Ravens, scores a touchdown during the second quarter of the game at MetLife Stadium on Sept. 11, 2022 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. (Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)

Lock: Rashod Bateman, Odell Beckham Jr., Zay Flowers, Nelson Agholor

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Near lock: Devin Duvernay

On the bubble: Tylan Wallace, James Proche II, Laquon Treadwell

Long shot: Mike Thomas, Andy Isabella, Shemar Bridges, Dontay Demus Jr., Tarik Black, Sean Ryan

Agholor impressed during offseason workouts, and the Ravens wouldn’t create much cap space with his release: just $1.7 million, according to Over The Cap. Duvernay, meanwhile, represents $4.3 million in potential cap savings, but with his ability as a returner and the group’s shaky injury history, his spot is likely secure.

If the Ravens keep six wide receivers, Wallace’s special teams ability (13.4 snaps per game last season) would make him a good bet to stick around. Proche and Treadwell are both coming off disappointing seasons. The long shots at wide receiver are even longer shots after the front office’s busy offseason.

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Tight end/fullback

Lock: Mark Andrews, Isaiah Likely, Charlie Kolar, Patrick Ricard

Near lock: None

On the bubble: Ben Mason

Long shot: Travis Vokolek

Ricard’s hip is the big question mark here. His recovery from offseason surgery sidelined him at mandatory minicamp, and he’ll start camp on the physically-unable-to-perform list. If Ricard’s ready to return by Week 1, the Ravens’ depth chart should be fairly predictable. If he’s not ready, a roster spot could open up for Mason or Vokolek, both of whom impressed in organized team activities.

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Parting with the perennial Pro Bowl pick is unlikely. Ricard has a $4.1 million cap hit in 2023, but releasing him would create just $1.7 million in space.

Offensive tackle

Lock: Ronnie Stanley, Morgan Moses, Daniel Faalele, Patrick Mekari

Near lock: None

On the bubble: None

Long shot: David Sharpe

With rookie Malaesala Aumavae-Laulu’s emergence inside, the Ravens will likely be less inclined to try Faalele at left guard. Stanley’s return to form should limit Mekari’s workload at left tackle, freeing him to get repetitions elsewhere along the line. Sharpe, who spent all of last season on the Ravens’ practice squad, has starting experience, though none since 2020.

Interior offensive line

Lock: Tyler Linderbaum, Kevin Zeitler, Malaesala Aumavae-Laulu, Andrew Vorhees (likely to be placed on non-football-injury list)

Near lock: None

On the bubble: John Simpson, Ben Cleveland, Sam Mustipher

Long shot: Brandon Kipper, Jaylon Thomas, Tashawn Manning, Jake Guidone, Tykeem Doss

The left guard battle will be studied closely in camp. Finances won’t loom large there, as Simpson, Cleveland and Aumavae-Laulu all have negligible cap hits in 2023. If the Ravens make space for four tackles and six interior linemen, all three left guard contenders could make the team’s initial roster, along with a backup center like Mustipher.

If the Ravens take just five interior linemen, Cleveland, Simpson or Mustipher could be cut. Vorhees, who tore his ACL in March, isn’t expected to play this season and, if placed on the NFI list, wouldn’t count against the 53-man roster.

Defensive line

Lock: Justin Madubuike, Broderick Washington, Michael Pierce, Travis Jones

Near lock: Brent Urban

On the bubble: Angelo Blackson, Rayshad Nichols

Long shot: Kaieem Caesar, Trey Botts

The Ravens’ top five up front are all but settled. Urban is a versatile rotational player who played in 16 games last season. Blackson has appeared in at least 15 games each of the past five years and would bolster the team’s depth at defensive tackle. If the Ravens keep more than five linemen, as they tend to do, Blackson would likely have to hold off Nichols, who appeared in one game as a rookie practice squad player last season.

Outside linebacker

Lock: Tyus Bowser, Odafe Oweh, David Ojabo, Tavius Robinson

Near lock: None

On the bubble: None

Long shot: Jeremiah Moon, Malik Hamm, Kelle Sanders

A late free-agent signing — Justin Houston, anyone? — would likely round out the Ravens’ group of edge rushers. Moon, who spent last season on the practice squad, and Hamm, a rookie and Baltimore native, have both flashed on defense at times. But barring injury, players on the bubble will need a standout preseason, especially on special teams, to claim a spot.

Inside linebacker

Lock: Roquan Smith, Patrick Queen, Trenton Simpson

Near lock: Malik Harrison, Kristian Welch

On the bubble: Del’Shawn Phillips, Josh Ross

Long shot: None

Harrison has starting experience, defends the run well and is probably the team’s best insurance policy if an injury sidelines Smith or Queen, especially early in the season. After Harrison, the real intrigue lies not in how the inside linebacker depth chart stacks up but in how many inside linebackers the Ravens’ special teams units will take.

Welch was re-signed this offseason after finishing behind only Harrison last year in special teams snaps. Phillips finished sixth while playing just one defensive snap. A foot injury interrupted Ross’ promising start in Baltimore, and he didn’t play after Week 2.

Cornerback

Lock: Marlon Humphrey, Rock Ya-Sin, Kyu Blu Kelly

Near lock: Jalyn Armour-Davis, Damarion “Pepe” Williams

On the bubble: Kevon Seymour, Trayvon Mullen, Daryl Worley

Long shot: Jordan Swann, Corey Mayfield Jr., Jeremy Lucien

The Ravens usually have six cornerbacks on their season-opening roster, and with another free-agent signing, they’d have a pretty distinct top six. Not that that would simplify the projections here. Armour-Davis and Williams will enter camp with injury concerns after bumpy rookie years. And the versatility of the Ravens’ safety group — Brandon Stephens has experience playing inside and outside, while Kyle Hamilton and Ar’Darius Washington can line up in the slot — could change the roster math.

There’s plenty of intrigue on the bubble, too. Seymour appeared in 14 games last season, finishing fourth on the team in special teams snaps. Mullen is a former second-round pick who signed a fully guaranteed $1.1 million deal this offseason. And Worley played eight games last season, though it’s unclear whether he’ll stick at cornerback.

Safety

Cornerback Marlon Humphrey #44 of the Baltimore Ravens celebrates with safety Geno Stone #26 of the Baltimore Ravens and safety Kyle Hamilton #14 of the Baltimore Ravens after an interception during the fourth quarter against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on September 25, 2022 in Foxborough, Massachusetts.
Ravens cornerback Marlon Humphrey (middle) celebrates with safeties Geno Stone (left) and Kyle Hamilton after an interception during the fourth quarter against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on Sept. 25, 2022 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)

Lock: Marcus Williams, Kyle Hamilton, Geno Stone, Brandon Stephens

Near lock: None

On the bubble: Ar’Darius Washington

Long shot: Jaquan Amos

The Ravens got a lot out of their safeties last season. Williams, Hamilton and Stone — along with Chuck Clark, who in March was traded to the New York Jets — were all reliable starters. Hamilton, Stone and Stephens all finished in the top eight of special teams snaps. Not much should change this season, even if their roles in the defense do.

Washington impressed in coverage in minicamp, but it won’t be easy to replace Hamilton in the slot. His 5-foot-8 frame could make him a liability against the run, and his limited special teams contributions over his first two years in Baltimore won’t bolster his roster case, either.

Specialists

Lock: Justin Tucker, Jordan Stout, Nick Moore

Near lock: None

On the bubble: None

Long shot: None

The Ravens might bring in a kicker later in camp to lighten Tucker’s load, but there’s no roster battles in sight.

jonas.shaffer@thebaltimorebanner.com

Jonas Shaffer is a Ravens beat writer for The Baltimore Banner. He previously covered the Ravens for The Baltimore Sun. Shaffer graduated from the University of Maryland and grew up in Silver Spring. 

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